Friday, March 29, 2013

French Tit for English Tat

Cape Breton Island
Cape Breton Island (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Sacré bleu! 


The French were worried.


Acadia, the lands around Hudson's Bay and Newfoundland
were handed over to Britain in 1713 by the Treaty of Utrecht.


The fur trade was going strong and men like explorer
LaVerondrye, (the first European to reach the Winnipeg basin),
 
were finding it more and more difficult to avoid the British

or their Indian allies.

 
So the French built a big scary fortress called Louisburg on
what later became Cape Breton Island. 


This was happy-making for the disgruntled Acadians.
They tweeted Louisburg constantly.

They did not tweet London.

So the British unffriended them saying they were hostile and

refused to swear loyalty to the English Monarch.


The not swearing of loyalty thing REALLY irritated the Brits.

Big time.

They were so pissed off they built Halifax in 1744
just to get in the face of the French King at Louisburg.

(Not that he actually lived there.)


And that was it.

The dye was cast.

The building of Halifax it made it inevitable that the antagonists
would have a major confrontation sooner rather than later.

 
The cataclysmic last years of the 18th century

were upon them all.

 

 

 

 

 

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